Category: About Your Land


Community Hub Survey – Please Respond by 16th August

As you know, we have formal planning approval for the community hub building as issued by Glasgow City Council in 2017. We must proceed now to the next step i.e. to meet the “Reserved Matters” as specified in the City’s approval notification. Drawings are now being prepared by our architect to meet these reserved matters to the satisfaction of the City and, at the same time, the same drawings will form part of our submission for a Building Warrant to allow us to build the project. Having already consulted with some groups, we now have some useful and interesting ideas about how this building might be used in the future. However, we would like to engage with more people to think about what the community will use it for? Accordingly: –

1. The available space would be roughly the equivalent size of a primary school classroom for 30 children i.e. 780 square feet (28sq ft X 28sq ft) or circa 26 square feet per child. To help you a wee bit with this to gauge size, 26 square feet is roughly 1.6 metres X 1.6 metres. A large, well proportioned living room would be roughly 360 square feet to give you yet another measure.
2. Facilities already planned for included toilet for wheel chair users with nappy changing facilities, a standard toilet, a small kitchenette with storage, refrigerator, coat hooks, wall cupboards, a blackboard wall, etc. To allow ease of access for prams and wheel chair users there are gentle ramp approaches to the facility’s entrances.
3. The building would utilise, wherever possible, sustainable recyclable building materials and generate its modest power requirements from all available and affordable natural resources e.g. air pumps or ground source heat pumps or solar panels. It is also hoped to use a form of reed bed to recycle waste products. These measures really go without saying as it is the clear intention of the committee to make the smallest workable footprint on both the site as well as minimise any impact on the Wood and environment as far as our finances will allow. Economically as well as environmentally, all of these proposed measures make sense and dove tail with the mission for safeguarding the Meadow which is, quite possibly, a first for Scotland.

Please consider the following questions and your responses will be most welcome. The deadline for responses is Friday, 16th August at midnight.

Survey link

Outdoor Access Code when using the Meadow and Wood

We follow The Scottish Outdoor Access Code when using and managing the land, doing this ensures that we are protecting the environment and people are safe and welcome. Many people use the land and we rely on volunteers and community members to also follow these rules. If you are using the land please can you have a look at the Scottish Outdoor Access Code. Together we can all enjoy and look after this beautiful wild place.Outdoor Access Code

The Importance of Diversionary Activities for Young People

The importance  of  Diversionary Activities for Young People

Since 2005 Glasgow’s violence levels have plummeted. This is thanks to the work of the Violence Reduction Unit (VRU). John Carnochan was one of the founders of the unit and in his Postcards from Scotland book – Conviction- he sets out what they did. For example, they took a public health perspective on violence and gangs, and made the problem the responsibility of lots of agencies, not just the police. They interacted with young people in gangs and provided alternative activities. The approach they instigated has led to a reduction in violent behaviour, including knife carrying, across Scotland.

Since the VRU started in Glasgow it has had most impact here and Glasgow rightly has become a model of good practice across the world. However, despite the VRU’s undeniable success in reducing Glasgow’s violence, the problem is far from fixed. I live in Maryhill and we have recently seen a rise in gang related activity and violence. So too have other local areas such as Lambhill, Possil and Cadder. Police Scotland describes the area on Maryhill Road as a MATAC – a Multi Agency Tasking and Coordinating spot. What this means is that it is a small geographical hotspot for violence. The police are now focusing their efforts to reduce crime there.

In our community there are some great initiatives for young people, but very little for teenagers involved in street gangs.

Established indoor clubs often don’t work for these young people anyway. This is because their behaviour is often seen as unacceptable: lots of swearing, play fighting, and graffiti, for example. They often don’t mix well with other groups of young people because they feel judged by those more in control of their emotions and behaviour. We know from our discussions with young people that many of them have multiple ACEs (adverse childhood experiences).

These children and young people are often unable to benefit from mainstream schooling. It’s pretty well impossible for teachers to handle such a wide range of needs and abilities in a single classroom. In many cases the young people’s challenging, anti-social behaviour leads to suspension or exclusion from school. This exacerbates the young people’s challenges, reducing the chance of developing the soft skills they need to integrate with mainstream activities, and potentially putting them at risk of being back in a vulnerable home or out on the street. They then fall further behind developmentally and this can be disastrous for their future lives.

Even out in the community our young people are facing barriers. They are often banned from various shops and other places they might congregate because of the number in their group and the way they behave. They are also at risk of taking dangerous drugs and misusing alcohol.

We keep hearing people saying of these youngsters involved in street gangs, ‘It’s their own fault’. But how would your own child fare if he or she was in their shoes and had to contend with some, or all, of the following? – little to no parental support emotionally or physically; exposure to various forms of implicit or explicit violence; extreme poverty; no money for out-of-school activities or personal transport to get there at night; exposure to casual substance abuse, and a local community, or school, which fails to provide support. Many have to overcome barriers that are more horrendous than most of us could imagine. How would you have fared between the age of nine and fifteen in these circumstances?

Yes, there are exceptions – those who excel in spite of extremely challenging circumstances. Others manage, despite difficult circumstances to create a reasonable life for themselves but too many struggle and never manage to turn their lives around.

In our area we can see that many of our most vulnerable young people are getting caught up in gang related behaviour and spiralling out of control. We believe that to stop this happening we need to involve them in diversionary activities. We also believe that the reason for their antisocial behaviour is not the young person’s fault but the result of inequality and poverty which is stressing their parents and leaving the young people with nothing to do and no money for hobbies and activities.

The problem is I cannot see this situation getting any better unless something radical happens. Young people need something to have control over, to hope for and to believe in. They need others to believe in them too. They need a place they can go to where people ask them: ‘What do you need?’ ‘What do you hope for?’ and ‘What do you enjoy? They need communities who are supportive. A lot of this is about developing trusting relationships.

This is what we The Children’s Wood has been trying to do in our own community through our G20 Festival. We have been working with a gang of young people for the last year and taking a bottom up/grassroots approach to finding out who they are, what do they need to flourish and how can we best support them. Thanks to funding from Glasgow City Council’s Hunger Fund and other funding, I believe we have created something quite special. We now have a team of amazing youth workers and a supportive community. Our numbers are increasing and other ‘gangs’ from different areas are coming to seek us out. I believe this is because they want something positive in their lives – something that engages with who they are now and what matters to them.

   

G20 Youth workers

When I wrote The Dear Wild Place I talked about the positive power of accessing local wild space for the mental and physical health of our young people, and I also talked about having access to a supportive community and how this can play a vital role in tackling gang related activity and for inclusion.  We have been collaborating with other community partners like Police Scotland, schools and our local McDonalds restaurant. Recently McDonalds told us how the young people have gone from causing mayhem in the shop to now diffusing fights and playing a positive role within the community. McDonalds have been developing positive relationships with many of the young people and their families.  This has happened through us all working together as a community and we are collectively making a difference.

 

Mc Donald’s staff at the Children’s Wood community ACES’s training event with Suzanne Zeedyke

We have a long way to go. While it has been hugely motivating and supportive for our young people to get support from Glasgow City Council, other groups and services need to do more for young people both locally and nationally. This has to be a priority since failing to do so will not only impact on the young person’s life but also the communities in which they live. This is everyone’s issue. Young people deserve more than their current lot. They deserve a better future.

 

The Reason I Jump App Launched

  • A free augmented reality experience now on offer to visitors to the Children’s Wood and North Kelvin Meadow from May 2019, celebrating neurodiversity through storytelling
  • Launched as part of the National Theatre of Scotland’s partnership with the National Autistic Society

Download  a free augmented reality experience and use it in the Meadow and Wood

Following the success of performances of the National Theatre of Scotland’s production of The Reason I Jump at Glasgow’s Children’s Wood and North Kelvin Meadow last summer, a free app for all ages, based on the production is being launched.

The Reason I Jump, based on the book by Naoki Higashida, translated by David Mitchell and Keiko Yoshida was a production conceived and directed by Graham Eatough and designed by Observatorium. It was an outdoor performance experienced within a maze and featuring a labyrinth created by the local community. The production was created with, and performed by, a group of Scottish artists with autism and was presented to critical acclaim in June 2018.

The free app offers an augmented reality experience for visitors to the  Children’s Wood and North Kelvin Meadow who will be able to enjoy aspects of the The Reason I Jumpthrough a specially developed digital experience, walking through the maze in search of labyrinthine marker-points. Once located – and viewed through the app – the marker points transform the surrounding space, filling it with sights and sounds. App Users will experience pop-up digital performances from the show, as well as music, stories and creative expressions gathered through a series of workshops with local young people on the autistic spectrum from High Park Communications Unit and Abercorn School.

The whole project is a celebration of neurodiversity through storytelling

Pupils from Abercorn join other cast members from RIJ

Pupils from Abercorn School including Coery Nicholson (cast member from Reason I Jump), join other RIJ cast members, Emma McCaffrey and Nicola Tuxworth and Nick Ward (CEO of National Autistic Society Scotland) and Karen Allan (National Theatre of Scotland) to help launch The Reason I Jump immersive app in the North Kelvin Meadow and Children’s Wood where visitors can interact with performances and stories from the 2018 production. Abercorn students were involved in the creation of the app. The National Theatre of Scotland works in partnership with National Autistic Society Scotland to bring theatre to neurodiverse audiences in Scotland and to celebrate the work of neurodiverse artists.

Elise Spence from Abercorn School, helps launch The Reason I Jump app

Elise Spence from Abercorn School, helps launch The Reason I Jump immersive app in the Children’s Wood and North Kelvin Meadow where visitors can interact with performances and stories from the 2018 production. . The National Theatre of Scotland works in partnership with National Autistic Society Scotland to bring theatre to neurodiverse audiences in Scotland and to celebrate the work of neurodiverse artists.

Nicola Tuxworth (Reason I Jump cast member), Cat MacFarlane (pupil at Abercorn School) and Emma McCaffrey (Reason I Jump cast member), helps launch The Reason I Jump immersive app in the Children’s Wood and North Kelvin Meadow where visitors can interact with performances and stories from the 2018 production. Abercorn students were involved in the creation of the app. The National Theatre of Scotland works in partnership with National Autistic Society Scotland to bring theatre to neurodiverse audiences in Scotland and to celebrate the work of neurodiverse artists.

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Look What We’ve Found On the Meadow and Wood

Over the past few years we have been working with the wider community to identify what species can be found on the Children’s Wood and Meadow. It is surprising how many creatures live on our Dear Wild Place. Our recorded collection is growing and this is all thanks to the RSPB and their Bioblitz tool.  The RSPB will join us on the  1st of June 1-4pm for another Bioblitz. Come and join us

The RSPB have supported us with all sorts of activities from putting up house sparrow boxes, planting meadow plots and running Bioblitz sessions.

A Bioblitz  is

an intense period of biological surveying in an attempt to record all the living species within a designated area. Groups of scientists, naturalists and volunteers conduct an intensive field study over a continuous time period (e.g., usually 24 hours).

During our bioblitz periods we have trapped and identified moths, spotted different birds, found a range of flower and tree species and delved into a world of insects and bugs. Our land is host to a huge number of interesting and diverse species. Here are just a few we have spotted:

Goldfinch

Two Spotted Ladybirds

Dog Rose

Waxwing

 

 

Have a look at our growing species list which can be found on the Glasgow Natural History website

Flower Power: The Land Needs You

Planting extravaganza 

when – 2nd March 11-2pm

where – Community Garden on North Kelvin Meadow

Come and join the community in supporting the development and biodiversity of the land. Seeds and plants will survive in the land much better after being cultivated at home first.

Collect seeds from us, plant them in a small pot and take them home to grow. After a few weeks you can bring them back to the land to plant.

Together we can do more for the land including increasing biodiversity, supporting the wild aspect of the land and also creating more colour throughout the year.

Everyone is welcome

The Dear Wild Place: Greenspaces, Community and Campaigning

In The Dear Wild Place local campaigner Emily Cutts recounts her community’s successful David and Goliath struggle against housing development in Glasgow’s North Kelvin Meadow, also known as ‘the Children’s Wood’. Emily talks about the importance of green space for physical and mental health. She explains why getting children outdoors is crucially important for their well-being and outlines the innovative projects at the heart of the Children’s Wood campaign.

In conversation with Carol Craig, series editor for Postcards from Scotland, Emily also reveals how her campaign group galvanised their community to challenge the rampant materialism of modern life.

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Meet our new Community Gardeners

Christine – Hello. I’m the new community gardener. I’ve been in the community development field for 35 years and I’m now working as a freelance gardener as it’s been my life long passion. I’m here on a Wednesday from 11-1 and I’m looking for volunteers to help prepare the community garden for Spring. I can’t wait to get to everyone and cook a big pot of soup with our produce next year!

 

Christine, Community Gardener

Stacey – I’ll be working with the gardening project as part of my university placement. I am currently in my 3rd year studying Community Development at the University of Glasgow. I’ve been in the community development sector for 5 years and in the past 2 years I have been leading a gardening project for young people where they have the opportunity to learn how to grow their own fruit and vegetables and cook yummy meals with their produce! I’m passionate about social change and equality. I can’t wait to get to stuck in and get my hands dirty! I hope to see you soon!

Community Development Worker

Stacey is also one of our youth workers at the G20 Youth Festival. More will be on here about that project soon.

Children’s Wood and Meadow Planning Application

The Children’s Wood  have submitted a planning application for developing the existing shed on The Children’s Wood and North Kelvin Meadow.  You may have received a letter about this.  The building currently stands at the Clouston Street Side of the land.  We plan to upgrade this building to support community development.  We plan to add on a small extension to allow us to work with community groups.  This will not be a nursery area as suggested in the title.  It will be a place to support our staff and volunteers, it will be a place that is dry and safe for schools and groups to leave bags and valuables when they come to visit, it will support community cooking sessions and other community activities.

Currently we have no running water, no electricity and no toilet. On top of this, our storage space is dark (since there is no electricity) and has no insulation, heating or structure for storage inside.  Having a space that can be a multifunctional space for community use will allow us to meet these needs.

The Children’s Wood employ 4 staff as well as many sessional workers, we support the involvement of over 100 volunteers locally.  Staff and volunteers help to manage the land and to involve community. Having the shed upgraded would make the conditions much more productive and supportive for staff and volunteers. Developing the shed will  allow us to work with groups who currently find it difficulty to access the land such as some older people and those facing physical constraints.  We hope this will build community and intergenerational connections.

The groups we currently run are:

  • outdoor toddler groups (Wednesday, Friday)
  • mental health group (Friday)
  • intergenerational outdoor play group (Saturday)
  • youth club
  • gardening and land maintenance  (Wednesday, monthly weekend sessions)
  • community events (monthly)
  • schools activities (daily)

You can see our plans on the attached pictures. If you want to find out more please give us a call on 07762029663

Planning application for the upgrade of the existing shed

AGM and skills share

Friday 23rd February
Learn a Skill: 3:30 – 4:30pm
@Children’s Wood
AGM 4:45 – 6:30pm
@Kelbourne Primary School

Skills Workshops – Children’s Wood 3:30pm until 4:30pm.

Workshops include:

  • Healthy Eating
  • Loose Parts Play
  • Fire
  • Nature Crafts

AGM – Kelbourne Primary School 4:45pm – 6:30pm

  • Snacks and drinks
  • CW charity – Where we’ve come from, where we’re going
  • Update regarding the shed upgrade
  • News from collaborative projects like National Theatre of Scotland, Visible Fiction, Beedookit and Theatre Studio
  • AGM admin: accounts, roles and responsibilities
  • Yearly programme of events
    Children are welcome